Monthly Archives: April 2016

“And did those feet…” Kelston vs Kelweston: calves or a church?

In part three of our conversation, Martin Palmer, director of the Alliance of Religion and Conservation, talks about how the Romans used local fossils, and interprets the Celtic origins of the name “Kelston”. Behind me is this stone here, part … Continue reading

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Kelston Roundhill today 29 April 2016

Photo by Tim Graham

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“It’s 3am on Moorland Road” by Jon Hamp

It’s 3 am on Moorland Road The lamplight strips the scene A trail of blood and bottles Shows where the tribe has been A fox shakes his head from the alley and slowly takes his bow It’s 3 am on … Continue reading

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Tim’s new “Kelston Roundhill” Flickr group

Tim Graham has started a new Kelston Roundhill Flickr group with a dozen terrific images. He writes Kelston Roundhill is one of my favourite places & I’ve been somewhat of an amateur photographer for the last 2 years so I’ve tried … Continue reading

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Defence, shrine or a place for storytelling? The mystery of the Roundhill’s ancient uses

What was this hill used for in ancient history? Is there evidence, or do we have to guess? In part two of a series, the artist Penney Ellis and I put these questions to the environmentalist and religious historian Martin Palmer. … Continue reading

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What’s in a name? Martin Palmer says why he prefers “Henstridge”.

The environmentalist and religious historian Martin Palmer, founder of the Alliance of Religion and Conservation, is a quiet genius based in Bath (and until recently Kelston). His book Sacred Land: Decoding Britain’s Extraordinary Past kicked off his Sacred Land project to help people rediscover … Continue reading

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“A girl walks a dog…” by Jon Hamp

A girl walks a dog To the crest of the hill Her thoughts of word unspoken. The last flags of day are torn on the west, And all the clouds are broken. Once, a day was a wave through the … Continue reading

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